AvePro Fact Sheets

Pest birds at a glance

Feral Pigeon

(Columba livia)

Feral Pigeon

Sparrow

(Passer domesticus)

Sparrow

Swallow

(Hiruno rustica & neoxena)

Swallow

Starling

(Sturnus vulgaris)

Starling

Australian White Ibis

(Threskiornis molucca)

Australian White Ibis

Autralian Magpie

(Gymnorhina tibicen)

Autralian Magpie

Silver Gull

(Larus novaehollandiae)

Silver Gull

Rainbow Lorikeet

(Trichoglossus haematodus)

Rainbow Lorikeet

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

(Cacatua galerita)

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Indian Myna

(Acridotheres tristis)

Indian Myna

Australian Raven

(Corvus coronoides)

Australian Raven

Torresian Crow

(Corvus orru)

Torresian Crow

Pest Bird Species of Australia

Australia is impacted by a very wide variety of exotic and native pest bird species. Some species congregate around retail, commercial, domestic and industrial situations, while others impact the horticultural and agricultural sectors. Correct identification is very important as some birds species are afforded protection status and cannot be killed (euthanaised or poisoned). Certain bird management systems are species-specific and may deter some species, but may not be suited to others. Never underestimate the commitment of pest birds to return to their home and nesting place.

For assistance, please call us on 1300 665 657.

Feral Pigeon

Feral Pigeon

Feral Pigeons

Other names

Rock dove

Scientific Name

Columba livia

Length

31-34cm

Weight

230-370g

Number of eggs

2

Nesting locations

Ledges, roof areas, gutters, and beams

Incubation Period

17-19 days

Fledging

25-28 days

Pest Status

Exotic pest bird

Product suggestions

AVEPRO Net, Spikes, Shock, Wire, Eagle Eye

Description

The plumage of Feral Pigeons ranges from black, brown white, piebald, and light grey. The neck is glossy green and purple. The wings are grey except for the black wing tips and two distinct black wing bars.

Pigeons have totally adapted their lives to a human created urban environment. Nesting in small communities, pigeons often emerge from their nesting and roosting place to join a flock of hundreds of birds. They thus have a very heavy impact on suburban streetscapes, industrial sites, grain storage facilities, ports and food processing plants. Their impact on food safety is a critical issue and the food processing and services industry are reacting favourably to the need for control.

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Common Myna

Common Myna

Common Myna

Other names

Indian myna

Scientific Name

Acridotheres tristis

Length

25-26cm

Weight

110-138g

Number of eggs

2-7

Nesting locations

Roof cavities, hollows or enclosed spaces

Incubation Period

17-18 days

Fledging

22-24 days

Pest Status

Exotic pest bird

Product suggestions

AVEPRO Net, Shock and Myna Magnet Trap

Description

The Common Myna has a glossy black forehead, crown, nape and cheeks, with bristly feathers on the forehead. Its legs and bill are yellow. There is also a yellow ring around the eyes. Wings are black, with a white patch at the bottom.

Mynas compete strongly with native birds such as the crimson rosella (Pell and Tidemann, 1996). They nest in hollows and building cavities and are carriers of bird mites. In Hawaii the bird is known as a major means of spread of harmful weeds in particular Lantana (Pimentel et al, 2000). Originally introduced into Melbourne, the Common myna was redistributed to the Townsville area as a means of controlling grasshoppers and cane beetles. It is now listed on the top 100 of the world’s worst invasive alien species (ISSG, 2004).

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House Sparrow

House Sparrow

House Sparrow

Other names

Common or European sparrow

Scientific Name

Passer domesticus

Length

14-15cm

Weight

24-39g

Number of eggs

3-5

Nesting location

Shrubbery, roof cavities, hollows or enclosed spaces

Incubation Period

11-14 days

Fledging

11-16 days

Pest Status

Exotic pest bird

Product suggestions

AVEPRO Net, Shock, Sparrow Magnet Trap

Description

The male House Sparrow has a grey crown, chestnut brown nape, dark brown and black-streaked back, grey underparts and a black bib. The bigger the bib, the more dominant the male. The female is paler, and lacks a grey crown, black bib and chestnut brown nape.

Like starlings, the house sparrow has both a rural and urban impact, defacing buildings as well as spoiling fruit, vegetable, grain and oilseed crops (Long, 1981; Bomford, 1992). They may also assist in the spread of diseases such as salmonella and tuberculosis (Weber, 1979). They are aggressive and compete with native birds for nesting sites and food. Their prolific breeding and early sexual maturity means that a single pair of birds can multiply to become a problem flock in a short space of time.

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Starling

Starling

Starling

Other names

Common or European starling

Scientific Name

Sturnus vulgaris

Length

22cm

Weight

75-90g

Number of eggs

3-8

Incubation Period

13-16 days

Fledging

18-21 days

Pest Status

Exotic pest bird

Product suggestions

AVEPRO Net, Shock, Myna Magnet Trap

Description

The Starling’s plumage is mainly blackish with buff edge wing feathers. Juvenile Starlings have grey-brown plumage with large white speckles on the underparts and light-cream coloured throats. The Starling has the reputation of being one of the noisiest and most gregarious garden birds.

These are both an urban and rural pest, causing high levels of damage to fruit crops and winter-sown cereals (Bomford, 1992). They also compete with and displace native birds for nesting hollows (Agriculture Western Australia, 1998). They are comfortable nesting in roof and ceiling cavities and cause significant damage to roof sarking and insulation as well as create a significant mess and health issue when nesting in confined roof and cavity spaces.

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Swallow

Swallow

Swallow

Other names

Welcome swallow

Scientific Name

Hirundo neoxena

Length

17-19cm

Weight

16-25g

Number of eggs

2-3

Incubation Period

14-21 days

Fledging

18-20 days

Pest Status

Native species – protected

Product suggestions

AVEPRO Net, Shock, Eagle Eye (with lights)

Description

Swallows are small birds with dark glossy blue backs, red throats, pale underparts and long distinctive tail streamers. They are extremely agile in flight Swallows will nest one to two times per year and return to the same location for each season.

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Australian Raven

Australian Raven

Australian raven

Other names

Scientific Name

Corvus coronoides

Similar Species

Torresian Crow Corvus orru

Length

45-47cm

Weight

370-650g

Nesting locations

High in trees – 10-30 meters

Number of eggs

4-7

Incubation Period

18-20 days

Fledging

28-35 days

Pest Status

Native species – protected

Product suggestions

AVEPRO Net, Spikes, Shock, Wire, Eagle Eye

Description

The Australian raven is a large black crow with neatly feathered thighs, and feathers around the base of the beak. This species is very intelligent bird and can be difficult to deter in most situations. While at first appearance its plumage is black, on closer inspection it has a green and purple iridescence. The tail is square in flight

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Silver Gull

Silver Gull

Silver gull

Other names

Sea gull

Scientific Name

Larus novaehollandiae

Length

40-45cm

Weight

260-350g

Nesting location

Roof areas (Victoria), coastal, grassy and waste areas

Number of eggs

1-3

Incubation Period

21-27 days

Fledging

35-37 days

Pest Status

Native species – protected

Product suggestions

AVEPRO Net, Spikes, Shock, Wire, Eagle Eye

Description

The Silver gull has become a significant problem in southern Australia where they nest of roofs of warehouses, factories, port areas and office blocks. Congregating on metal roofs may reduce the life of the roof by up to 50%. Silver gulls also impact coastal areas and waste disposal areas.

The primary gull in Australia is the silver gull (Larus novaehollandiae), a significantly smaller species than the dominant pest gull species in north America or western Europe (the pacific gull). Traditionally restricted in range to coastal areas, the silver gull now inhabits inland, rural and regional towns. The silver gull inhabits and nests in the waste management facilities of many townships throughout coastal and inland Australia.

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